Earth and Space Science and Engineering

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About the Program

Geomatics Engineering is concerned with the development of new technologies for the acquisition, analysis, management and distribution of geospatial data and with the creation and implementation of new decision-making tools and applications based on the geospatial information. It involves the design and development of new software tools and algorithms to analyse, interpret and graphically represent the acquired data in formats useful to the end-users. It also involves designing, testing and mounting small portable sensors and transmitters on satellites, aircraft, land-based vehicles and water-based vehicles.

Our geomatics engineering program at Lassonde, unique in Ontario, emphasizes practical and professional experience through field courses that will train you in instrument familiarization, geodetic surveys, land and engineering surveying, remote sensing using aerial and satellite imagery, and digital terrain modeling. Geomatics students at Lassonde are immersed in the complexities of a broad range of specialisms, including digital planning and 3D reconstruction from satellite imagery, precise positioning and navigation with GPS, measurement of impact of tidal, climate, and glacial changes, and study of the motion of the Earth’s core.

Important Note

Please email your queries to sbisnath@yorku.ca
Sunil Bisnath, Undergraduate Program Director of Geomatics Science & Engineering.

student gives video testimonial
• Strong practical program with field courses between third and fourth years, including: instrument familiarization, highway design and construction survey, boundary survey problems, astronomic azimuth, precise engineering survey, geodetic control survey and satellite survey.
• Paid co-op or an industrial internship opportunities after third year to apply the theoretical and technical competencies acquired to real life challenges, and in doing so build experience that will count toward their professional designation
• Two-week Field Survey course in Algonquin Park at the Radio Observatory.
• Opportunity to research in York’s Engineering Design Lab — specially designed to be unaffected by the natural vibrations of the building where it was built
Geomatics engineers collect, analyze, manage and distribute geographical information that is critical for trade, transportation, navigation, and a rapidly expanding range of personal technology from shopping to smartphone apps to driving aids. Here are just some of the fields where geomatics techniques are critical:

• Geospatial 3D mapping and modelling
• Location-based services
• Remote sensing and earth observations
• Mining
• Pollution management
• Transport
• Urban planning
The Association of Ontario Land Surveyors (AOLS) Educational Foundation is a registered charity (13456 8161) that was founded in 1973 to: “…receive and maintain a fund…for educational and charitable purposes within the Province of Ontario.” The fund began with a $5000 donation from Jack Barnes, OLS through his company J. D. Barnes Limited, who recognized that it was important for surveying practitioners to support students, acknowledge them for their academic achievements and encourage them to pursue a career in land surveying.

Since 1975, the AOLS Educational Foundation has presented academic awards totalling more than $311,000 to more than three-hundred students. Over $30,000 is awarded each year to post-secondary Geomatics students who have attained high academic achievement and possess evident characteristics of leadership and professionalism.

There are a number of awards available to students studying Geomatics Engineering at York. Click here to learn more.
Esri Canada is proud to recognize Canadian post-secondary institutions that deliver strong, multidisciplinary GIS courses and programs. This scholarship provides recipients with great networking opportunities, funding and access to extensive GIS resources including Esri software, books and training to develop their GIS skills and knowledge. Contact Dr. Gunho Sohn for more information about eligibility and applications.

Courses

First Year

Fall

MATH 1013, 3 Credits

Introduction to the theory and applications of both differential and integral calculus. Limits. Derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Riemann sums, definite integrals and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Logarithms and exponentials, Extreme value problems, Related rates, Areas and Volumes.

Prerequisite: SC/MATH 1520 3.00, or 12U Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U) or equivalent.
Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1300 3.00, SC/MATH 1505 6.00, SC/MATH 1530 3.00, SC/MATH 1550 6.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1930 3.00, AP/ECON 1530 3.00, SC/ISCI 1401 3.00 and SC/ISCI 1410 6.00.
MATH 1025, 3 Credits

Topics include spherical and cylindrical coordinates in Euclidean 3-space, general matrix algebra, determinants, vector space concepts for Euclidean n-space (e.g. linear dependence and independence, basis, dimension, linear transformations etc.), an introduction to eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

Prerequisites: 12U Advanced functions (MHF4U) or equivalent.
Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1021 3.00, SC/MATH 2221 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 2650 3.00.
PHYS 1800, 3 Credits

Survey of the fundamental concepts of statics and dynamics with an emphasis on engineering applications. This is a calculus-based course intended primarily for engineering students. Prerequisites: 12U Physics or OAC Physics or SC/PHYS 1510 4.00. MHF4U Advanced Functions and MCV4U Calculus and Vectors, or 12U Advanced Functions and Introductory Calculus, or OAC Algebra and OAC Calculus.

Corequisites: SC/MATH 1013 3.00 or SC/MATH 1300 3.00 or SC/MATH 1505 6.00.
Course Credit Exclusions: SC/PHYS 1010 6.00, SC/PHYS 1410 6.00, SC/PHYS 1420 6.00; SC/ISCI 1310 6.00; SC/ISCI 1301 3.00.
ENG 1101, 4 Credits

Who is an engineer and what are his/her ethical and academic integrity obligations; communications strategies for technical subjects in oral and written forms; dealing with ambiguity, uncertainties, and open ended problems in a technical context, problem definition strategies. 4 hours per week lectures and 1 hour per week tutorial session.
EECS 1101, 3 Credits

The Objectives of 1011 are threefold: providing a first exposure to procedural programming, teaching students a set of soft computing skills (such as reasoning about algorithms, tracing programs, test-driven development), and demonstrating how computers are used in a variety of engineering disciplines. It uses problem-based pedagogy to expose the underlying concepts and an experiential laboratory to implement them. An integrated computing environment (such as MATLAB) is used so that students can pick up key programming concepts(such as variables and control flow) without being exposed to complex or abstract constructs. The problems are chosen with consultation with the various engineering disciplines in the Faculty with a view of exposing how computing is used in these disciplines.

Course credit exclusions: LE/EECS1541 3.00.

Winter

MATH 1014, 3 Credits

Calculus in Polar Coordinates. Techniques of Integration. Indeterminate Forms. Improper Integrals. Sequences, infinite series and power series. Approximations. Introduction to ordinary differential equations.

Prerequisite(s): One of SC/MATH 1013 3.00, SC/MATH 1300 3.00, GL/MATH 1901 3.00, or SC/ISCI 1401 3.00 ; for non-science students only, six credits from SC/MATH 1530 3.00 and SC/MATH 1540 3.00, SC/MATH 1550 6.00, AP/ECON 1530 3.00 and AP/ECON 1540 3.00.
Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1310 3.00, SC/MATH 1505 6.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1940 3.00, SC/ISCI 1402 3.00, SC/ISCI 1410 6.00.
CHEM 1100, 4 Credits

The course is designed for Engineering students interested in refreshing and expending their general chemistry knowledge while exploring the relationship between structure of matter, properties and processing. This course will focus mainly at covering important introductory concept to understand solution chemistry including reactivity, thermochemistry, structure and properties of materials. The course is divided in six sections. The first section covers an introduction to the topic of Materials Science and its impact on our daily lives as well as future trends and review key chemistry concepts required for this course. The second section will present the states of matter (gas, liquid and solid), their physical characteristics and the forces holding materials together (bonding and intermolecular forces). The third section will expend on the liquid phase and properties of solutions including equilibrium, solubility, pH and pKa. The fourth section will deal with thermochemistry and its first law with an emphasis on enthalpy as well as phase changes and phase diagrams. Section six will present an introduction to the properties of solids (electronic and mechanical) and criteria in the selection of materials will also be discussed. Section seven will present in more details structure-properties and processing of soft materials (natural and artificial polymer) in the context of the material covered in the other sections.

Prerequisites: 12U chemistry or equivalent.
Course credit exclusion: SC/CHEM 1000 3.00.
PHYS 1801, 3 Credits

A survey of physics in which fundamental concepts in electricity, magnetism and optics are emphasized through engineering applications. This is a calculus-based course intended primarily for engineering students.

Prerequisite: SC/PHYS 1800 3.00 and SC/MATH 1013 3.00 or equivalent.
Corequisites: SC/MATH 1014 3.00 or SC/MATH 1310 3.00 or SC/MATH 1505 6.00.
Course Credit Exclusions: SC/PHYS 1010 6.00, SC/PHYS 1410 6.00, SC/PHYS 1420 6.00; SC/ISCI 1310 6.00; SC/ISCI 1302 3.00.
ENG 1102, 4 Credits

This course will cover: engineering design methodology; features and elements of good design with environment and human interface considerations; aesthetics in design and idea communication using graphics and technical drawings.

Prerequisite: LE/ENG 1101 4.00.
EECS 1021, 3 Credits

“Introduces student to computational thinking – a process-based approach to problem solving. It uses a problem-based pedagogy to expose the underlying concepts and an experiential laboratory to implement them. The programming language is chosen so that it is widely used in a variety of applications, is object-oriented, and is of industrial strength (Java is an example of such a language). The problems are chosen in order to expose abstract programming concepts by immersing them in relevant and engaging applications. The experiential laboratory is based on sensors and actuators that connect to a computer. The problems are chosen with consultation with the various engineering disciplines in the Faculty with a view of exposing how computing is used in these disciplines.

Prerequisites: LE/EECS1011 3.00.
Course credit exclusions: LE/EECS 1022 3.00.
Previously offered as: LE/EECS1020 3.00, LE/CSE 1020 3.00.
ESSE 1012, 3 Credits

Provides essential topics in Earth environment (Earth and oceanic science, atmospheric science, and geology) and explores the role played by global and local scale processes in shaping our planet. Concepts are described; the latest technology discussed, and links between engineering disciplines are provided. The course lectures are complemented by hands-on laboratory and field experience.

Prerequisites: 12U calculus and vectors or 12U advanced functions, or SC/MATH 1515 3.00; 12U physics or SC/PHYS 1510 4.00.
Corequisites: LE/ENG 1101 4.00; LE/ENG 1102 4.00; SC/PHYS 1800 3.00, SC/PHYS 1801 3.00.

 * Offered in Fall/ Winter Semester

Second Year

Fall

CIVL 2150, 3 Credits

Introduction to computer-aided drawing with applications in civil engineering and related disciplines. Students will learn about the principles of engineering drawings, create typical drawings using Computer-aided Drawing (CAD) tools, and read and interpret civil and geomatics engineering drawings.

Prerequisite: LE/ENG 1102 4.00.
ENG 2001, 3 Credits

Introduction to the management, economics and safety as they relate to engineering projects, including the following. Project management: work breakdown structures, Gantt charts, logic diagrams and change management. Engineering economics: time value of money, comparison methods, rates of return. Workplace safety. Group design projects.

Prerequisites: LE/ENG 1101 4.00 or LE/ENG 1000 6.00.
MATH 2015, 3 Credits

Topics covered include partial derivatives; grad, div, curl and Laplacian operators; line and surface integrals; theorems of Gauss and Stokes; double and triple integrals in various coordinate systems; extrema and Taylor series for multivariate functions.

Prerequisite: One of SC/MATH 1010 3.00, SC/MATH 1014 3.00, SC/MATH 1310 3.00; or SC/MATH 1505 6.00 plus permission of the course coordinator.
Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 2010 3.00, SC/MATH 2310 3.00, GL/MATH 2670 3.00, GL/MODR 2670 3.00, GL/MATH 3200 3.00.
MATH 2930, 3 Credits

This is an applied probability and statistics course for engineering students. The aim is to provide an application oriented introduction to probability and statistics. The examples will be from a wide selection of engineering disciplines. The probability component is about 30% of the lectures. About 40% of the time, the lectures and tutorials focus on solving practical statistical problems that emerge from engineering problems.

Prerequisites: SC/MATH 1014 3.00 or equivalent; SC/MATH 1025 3.00 or equivalent; LE/EECS 1011 3.00 or equivalent.
Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1131 3.00; SC/MATH 2560 3.00; SC/MATH 2570 3.00; SC/MATH 2565 3.00.
MATH 2271, 3 Credits

Introduction to ordinary and partial differential equations, including their classification, boundary conditions, and methods of solution. Equations, methods, and solutions relevant to science and engineering are emphasized, and exploration is encouraged with the aid of software. Three lecture hours per week. One term. Three credits.

Prerequisites: One of SC/MATH 2015 3.00, SC/MATH 2310 3.00 or equivalent; one of SC/MATH 1025 3.00, SC/MATH 2022 3.00, SC/MATH 2222 3.00 or equivalent.
Course Credit Exclusions: SC/MATH 2270 3.00, GL/MATH 3400 3.00.
PHYS 2020, 3 Credits

The elements of electric and magnetic fields are developed together with DC and AC circuit theory.

Prerequisites: SC/PHYS 1010 6.00, or SC/PHYS 1800 3.00 and SC/PHYS 1801 3.00, or SC/ISCI 1310 6.00, or a minimum grade of C in SC/PHYS 1410 6.00 or SC/PHYS 1420 6.00.
Corequisite: SC/MATH 2015 3.00.

Winter

ESSE 2220, 3 Credits

This course provides a basis for the design, development and implementation of computational algorithmic methods specifically for applied geomatics and space engineering applications and trains students to obtain essential skills in algorithmic development for problem solving through the usage of commonlyused industry software tools and programming language(s), and mathematical and statistical algorithms. Examples and applications explored come from the broad common interests in Space Science & Engineering, and Geomatics Science & Engineering.

Pre-requisite(s): LE/ENG 1102 4.00, LE/EECS 1021 3.00, SC/MATH 1014 3.00, SC/MATH 1025 3.00; SC/PHYS 1801 3.00.
Course Credit Exclusion: EECS 2030 3.00, EECS 2031 3.00, EECS 2032 3.00.
ENG 2003, 3 Credits

Students learn to effectively employ communication strategies essential to a successful engineering career, including the social, rhetorical, ethical, and practical aspects of professional communications. The focus is on building individuals’ confidence and judgment through communications assignments based on case studies.

Prerequisite: LE/ENG 1101 4.00.
ESSE 2615, 3 Credits

An introduction and overview of geomatics engineering. The topics discussed in the course provide the fundamentals of all aspects of geomatics engineering as a profession and includes illustrative examples and discussions with practicing geomatics engineers in the field. The course introduces the student to key concepts in geomatics including geodesy, surveying, remote sensing, navigation, mapping and spatial data analytic. The skill sets required of geomatics engineers are investigated. Written and oral technical communication skills are emphasized.

Prerequisites: LE/ESSE 1012 3.00, SC/MATH 1025 3.00, LE/EECS 1021 3.00, and SC/PHYS 1801 3.00, or permission of the Instructor.
ESSE 2620, 3 Credits

Coordinate systems, conventions and transformations. First and second geodetic problems: trig sections, traverses, areas, volumes. Basics of random error theory and error propagation. Basics of map projection. Distance measurements, angular measurements, and heights. Topographic mapping and property surveys. Route surveying. Construction surveying. Introduction to other surveys: alignment surveys for buildings, bridges, dams, tunnels, and pipelines.

Prerequisites: LE/ESSE 1012 3.00, SC/MATH 1014 3.00, SC/MATH 1025 3.00 OR SC/MATH 1021 3.00.
ESSE 2630, 3 Credits

A two-week field camp comprising field and office work that simulate professional practice. Students participate in organizational, planning, scheduling and logistical aspects of field operations, instrument familiarization and testing, establishment of geodetic control, and land boundary, highway and construction surveys. Two-week field surveys.

Prerequisite: LE/ESSE 2620 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2014: Prerequisite: LE/EATS 2620 4.00 or LE/ENG 2120 4.00.
PRIOR TO SUMMER 2013: Prerequisite: SC/EATS 2620 4.00 or SC/ENG 2120 4.00
ESSE 2640, 3 Credits

Observables, observations, parameters and mathematical models. Random errors in measurements. Error propagation. The least squares principle and applications. Hypothesis tests.

Prerequisites: SC/MATH 1025 3.00; SC/MATH 1014 3.00; SC/MATH 2015 3.00; SC/MATH 2930 3.00 or SC/MATH 2565 3.00 or SC/GEOG 2420 3.00; LE/EECS 1021 3.00 or LE/EECS 1541 3.00 or permission of instructor.
Course Credit Exclusions: LE/ESSE 3620 3.00.

Complimentary Studies (3 Credits) – Second Year

 ** Offered in Winter/Summer Semester

Third Year

Fall

ENG 3000, 3 Credits

An introduction to the legal and ethical frameworks of the engineering profession, preparing students for the Professional Practice Examination required for certification as a professional engineer. Also covered are associated professional issues such as entrepreneurship, intellectual property and patents.

Prerequisites: LE/ENG 2001 3.00.
Course credit exclusions: LE/EECS 3000 3.00
ESSE 3600, 3 Credits

Fundamentals of geographic information systems (GIS) and spatial analysis. Functional requirements of GIS. Geopositioning, map projections, coordinate systems and transformations. Data sources. Modelling of real world, spatial and attribute data. Vector and raster data models and structures. Data conversion and integration. Topological relationships and structures. Data processing and spatial analysis. Editing and data quality. Data management and spatial database structures. Visualization of spatial data. Introduction to GIS modelling.

Prerequisites: LE/ESSE 1010 3.00 or LE/ESSE 1012 3.00; LE/EECS 1011 3.00 or LE/EECS 1541 3.00; SC/MATH 1014 3.00; SC/MATH 1025 3.00; SC/MATH 2930 3.00 or SC/MATH 2565 3.00 or SC/GEOG 2420 3.00; Date of submission: 2018-04-03
The fundamental concepts and techniques of GIS are presented along with detailed discussion of computer implementation. The emphases include database management and map analysis/spatial modelling. PC ArcView with Spatial Analyst extension GIS programs are used for hands-on exercises.
Prerequisites: LE/EECS 1540 3.00 or LE/EECS 1030 3.00 or LE/EECS 1520 3.00; SC/MATH 2560 3.00 or AP/GEOG 2420 3.00 or SC/GEOG 2420 3.00 or SC/MATH 1131 3.00; SC/MATH 1025 3.00 or SC/MATH 1013 3.00; both LE/ESSE 1010 3.00 and LE/ESSE 1011 3.00, or LE/ESSE 2030 3.00, or AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or SC/GEOG 1400 6.00, or permission of the Instructor.
ESSE 3610, 3 Credits

Date Submission: 2017-12-05 Geodesy. Reference systems, frames and datums; time systems; the natural system of coordinates; terrestrial, celestial and orbital coordinate systems. Coordinate system transformations. Relative three dimensional positioning; the inertial frame of reference. Positions on the ellipsoid and mapping plane. Height systems.

Prerequisites: LE/ESSE 2615 3.00; LE/ESSE 2620 3.00; SC/MATH 2015 3.00.
Corequisite: LE/ESSE 3620 3.00.
ESSE 4020, 3 Credits

Treatment of discrete sampled data involving correlation, convolution, spectral density estimation, frequency, domain filtering, and Fast Fourier Transforms.

Prerequisites: LE/EECS 1011 3.00 or equivalent programming experience; SC/MATH 2015 3.00; SC/MATH 2271 3.00. PRIOR TO SUMMER 2014:
Prerequisites: LE/CSE 1540 3.00 or SC/CSE 1540 3.00 or equivalent programming experience; SC/MATH 2015 3.00; SC/MATH 2271 3.00.
Course credit exclusions: LE/CSE 3451 4.00, SC/CSE 3451 4.00 LE/CSE 3451 3.00, SC/CSE 3451 3.00, SC/MATH 4130B 3.00, SC/MATH 4930C 3.00.
ESSE 4220, 3 Credits

Principles used in extracting physical information about the Earth’s surface using remote sensing. Remote sensing in the visible, short-wave infrared, thermal infrared and microwave regions is discussed in terms of potential applicability to forestry, agriculture, water resources and geology. Two lecture hours, three laboratory hours. One term. Three credits.

Prerequisite(s): SC/PHYS 2020 3.00; LE/EECS 1021 3.00 or LE/EECS 1541 3.00.
ESSE 2210, 3 Credits

This course surveys a variety of Canadian case studies in environmental sustainability from an engineering perspective. The goal of this course is to provide students with exposure to the social aspects of large infrastructure projects, including the environmental assessment and stakeholder consultation processes. Climate change mitigation and adaptation are strong themes of this course.

Winter

ESSE 3020, 3 Credits

Studies of isostatic equilibrium and glacial rebound; seismic tomography and spherical harmonic representation of gravity and the geoid; Earth rotation and geodesy; geothermal heat flow and mantle convection.

Prerequisites: LE/ESSE 2030 3.00; LE/ESSE 2470 3.00 or SC/PHYS 2010 3.00 or permission of Instructor; SC/MATH 2015 3.00; SC/MATH 2271 3.00; SC/PHYS 2020 3.00
ESSE 3630, 3 Credits

Functional models of measurements. Statistical testing and assessment of observations, parameters and mathematical models. Optimal design. Generalized least squares problems with constraints and singularities, step-by-step procedures. Application in control networks.

Prerequisites: LE/ESSE 2640 3.00, LE/ESSE3610 3.00; or permission of instructor
ESSE 3640, 3 Credits

Date Submission: December 5, 2018 Instrument systems and procedures for high-precision/accuracy geodetic surveys. ISO Standard 17123. High-precision surveys in engineering physics; geodetic network densification, adjustment and analysis; procedures for deformation surveys and strain analysis. Establishment, observation, adjustment and analysis of control networks for construction and monitoring of large engineering structures.

Prerequisites: LE/ESSE 2620 3.00; LE/ESSE 2630 3.00; LE/ESSE 3610 3.00; LE/ESSE 3620 3.00.
Note: Recommend students to take LE/ESSE 3630 3.00 together.
ESSE 3650, 3 Credits

Date submission: December 5, 2018 Object metric information from imagery. Image and object space. Coordinate transformations. Measurement and correction of image coordinates. Collinearity and coplanarity conditions. Orientation procedures. Stereo-model. Independent models, bundle, strip and block photogrammetric triangulation. Sensor pose estimation. Digital photogrammetry and 3D reconstruction. Structure from Motion and dense image point matching. Image rectification. DEM and orthoimage generation. UAV and close-range photogrammetry. Project planning. Applications.

Prerequisites: LE/ESSE 2615 3.00, LE/ESSE 2640 3.00, LE/EECS 1011 3.00 or LE/EECS 1541 3.00.
Exclusions: LE/CSE 3451 4.00, SC/CSE 3451 4.00 LE/CSE 3451 3.00, SC/CSE 3451 3.00, SC/MATH 4130B 3.00, SC/MATH 4930C 3.00.
ESSE 3660, 3 Credits

A two-full-week camp comprising field and laboratory work. It involves organizational, planning, scheduling and logistical aspects of high precision field operations related to engineering physics, establishment and observation of control networks for construction and monitoring large engineering structures.

Prerequisites: LE/ESSE 3640 3.00.
ESSE 4220, 3 Credits

Principles used in extracting physical information about the Earth’s surface using remote sensing. Remote sensing in the visible, short-wave infrared, thermal infrared and microwave regions is discussed in terms of potential applicability to forestry, agriculture, water resources and geology. Two lecture hours, three laboratory hours. One term. Three credits.

Prerequisite(s): SC/PHYS 2020 3.00; LE/EECS 1021 3.00 or LE/EECS 1541 3.00.
ESSE 3670, 3 Credits

Satellite-based positioning, navigation and timing. Spatial and temporal reference systems. Orbital mechanics. GNSS signal structure, hardware, observables, and error sources. GNSS point positioning, relative positioning, and augmentation techniques. GNSS / inertial integration. GNSS evolution and applications. Course Credit Exclusion LE/ESSE 4610 3.00.

Prerequisites: LE/ESSE 3610 3.00; LE/ESSE 3620 3.00 or LE/ESSE 2640 3.00.
ESSE 2210, 3 Credits

The concept of feedback and its use in circuits employing operational amplifiers; analysis/design of such circuits, including amplifiers, filters, oscillators, pulse generators; digital concepts and logic circuits with applications to data manipulation (computers) and storage.

Prerequisite: SC/PHYS 3050 3.00.
Course credit exclusion: LE/ENG 2210 3.00.
PRIOR TO SUMMER 2013: Prerequisite: SC/PHYS 1010 6.00; and SC/PHYS 3050 3.00 recommended.
Course credit exclusion: SC/ENG 2210 3.00.

Complimentary Studies (3 Credits) – Third Year

 * Offered in Fall/ Winter Semester  ** Offered in Winter/Summer Semester

Fourth Year

Fall

ENG 4000, 6 Credits

The project will include significant elements of design and implementation. The format is intended to resemble engineering projects in practice, including specifications, background research, innovative solutions, analysis, testing and communication. 2 terms.

Prerequisite(s): 21 3000-level science or engineering credits in the Engineering Program, exclusive of LE/ENG 3000 3.00.
Prerequisite or corequisite: LE/ENG 3000 3.00. Course credit exclusions: CIVL4000, ESSE4000.
ESSE 4630, 3 Credits

Digital imaging from remote platforms. Image processing and analysis, including radiometric and geometric corrections and geometric enhancements, multispectral classification, digital photogrammetry fundamentals, workstations, photogrammetric processing.

Prerequisites: LE/ESSE 3650 3.00; LE/ESSE 4220 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2014: Prerequisites: LE/EATS 3650 4.00 or LE/ENG 3150 4.00; LE/EATS 4220 3.00.
PRIOR TO SUMMER 2013: Prerequisites: SC/EATS 3650 4.00 or SC/ENG 3150 4.00; SC/EATS 4220 3.00.
ENG 4640, 6 Credits

Digital Terrain Modeling (DTM) concepts. Mathematical techniques in data acquisition, processing, storage, manipulation and applications. DTM. Surface representation using moving averages, linear projection and Kriging techniques. Grid resampling methods and search algorithms. DTM derivatives and applications. LIDAR systems and applications.

Prerequisites: LE/ESSE 2620 3.00; LE/ESSE 3620 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2014: Prerequisites: LE/EATS 2620 4.00 or LE/ENG 2110 2.00; LE/EATS 3620 4.00 or LE/ENG 3110 4.00.
PRIOR TO SUMMER 2013: Prerequisites: SC/EATS 2620 4.00 or SC/ENG 2110 2.00; SC/EATS 3620 4.00 or SC/ENG 3110 4.00.

Winter

ENG 4000, 6 Credits

The project will include significant elements of design and implementation. The format is intended to resemble engineering projects in practice, including specifications, background research, innovative solutions, analysis, testing and communication. 2 terms.

Prerequisite(s): 21 3000-level science or engineering credits in the Engineering Program, exclusive of LE/ENG 3000 3.00.
Prerequisite or corequisite: LE/ENG 3000 3.00. Course credit exclusions: CIVL4000, ESSE4000.
ENG 4600, 3 Credits

Project-oriented geomatics course using GIS systems (Arc/Info and S-PLus or SPSS for UNIX) and various techniques (map algebraic, statistical, fuzzy logic, AI, neural network and fractal/multifractal) for integrating diverse dataset (geological, geophysical, geochemical, remote sensing and GPS).

Prerequisite: One of LE/ESSE 3600 3.00, AP/GEOG 3180 3.00 or SC/GEOG 3180 3.00, AP/GEOG 4340 3.00 or SC/GEOG 4340 3.00, ES/ENVS 3520 3.00, ES/ENVS 4520 3.00, or permission of the Instructor.
PRIOR TO FALL 2014: Prerequisite: One of LE/EATS 3300 3.00, AP/GEOG 3180 3.00 or SC/GEOG 3180 3.00, AP/GEOG 4340 3.00 or SC/GEOG 4340 3.00, ES/ENVS 3520 3.00, ES/ENVS 4520 3.00, or permission of the Instructor.
PRIOR TO SUMMER 2013: Prerequisite: One of SC/EATS 3300 3.00, AP/GEOG 3180 3.00 or SC/GEOG 3180 3.00, AP/GEOG 4340 3.00 or SC/GEOG 4340 3.00, ES/ENVS 3520 3.00, ES/ENVS 4520 3.00, or permission of the Instructor.
ESSE 4620, 3 Credits

Local treatment of the Earth’s gravity field. Boundary value problems. Normal and disturbing potential, the normal gravity formula. Geoid, geoidal undulations, deflections of the vertical. Stokes and Vening Meinesz formulae. Gravimetry and gravity reductions. Height systems. Tides. Gravity space missions.

Prerequisites: LE/ESSE 3020 3.00; LE/ESSE 3610 3.00; LE/ESSE 3620 3.00; LE/ESSE 4610 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2014: Prerequisites: LE/EATS 3020 3.00; LE/EATS 3610 4.00 or LE/ENG 3110 4.00; LE/EATS 3620 4.00 or LE/ENG 3120 4.00; LE/EATS 4610 3.00 or LE/ENG 4110 3.00.
PRIOR TO SUMMER 2013: Prerequisites: SC/EATS 3020 3.00; SC/EATS 3610 4.00 or SC/ENG 3110 4.00; SC/EATS 3620 4.00 or SC/ENG 3120 4.00; SC/EATS 4610 3.00 or SC/ENG 4110 3.00.

 * Offered in Fall/ Winter Semester

Complimentary Studies (6 Credits) – Fourth Year

Two of: LE/ESSE 4660 3.00, LE/ESSE 4680 3.00 or LE/ESSE 4690 3.00

Two of: LE/ESSE 4615 3.00, LE/ESSE 4650 3.00, LE/ESSE 4670 3.00 or LE/ESSE 4695 3.00

TOTAL CREDITS & CGPA (minimum overall GPA of 5.00 required to graduate in the BEng program)