Lassonde Civil Engineering

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Environmental Engineering

GS/CIVL 6110, 3 Credits

This course introduces the student to aspects of fundamentals and applications of mass, momentum, and heat transport in environmental engineering and will be introduced to concepts of advection, diffusion, dispersion, settling, surface transfer, kinetics and equilibrium processes in air, water and soil. There are no prerequisites for this course.
CGS/CIVL 6120, 3 Credits

This course introduces the student to aspects of molecular biology of environmental engineering processes and will be introduced to modern techniques and practices in biotechnology and bioengineering and develops the basic skills required to design an environmental biotechnology. There are no prerequisites for this course.
GS/CIVL 6111, 3 Credits

This course is aimed specifically at Engineers who need a broad base introduction to analytical instrumentation tools for the measurement of different chemical, structure, and biological properties and processes. There are no prerequisites for this course.
GS/CIVL 6121, 3 Credits

This course is aimed at preparing the students to the diverse nature of the air pollution problem, and atmospheric dispersion of air pollutants. There are no prerequisites for this course.
GS/CIVL 6100, 3 Credits

Emerging, current, or timely topics in Environmental Engineering that may be offered as a Directed Reading course.

Geotechnical Engineering

GS/CIVL 6210, 3 Credits

Soil properties and behaviour examined using Critical State Soil Mechanics (CSSM). Topics include: soil as a geomaterial; soil properties and their measurement; soil constitutive modelling; isotropic and anisotropic elastic models; plasticity theory; elastic-plastic model; Cam-clay model; critical states; shear strength of soils; stress-dilatancy; elastic-viscoplastic model; applications of elastic-plastic soil models. Students are expected to have completed an undergraduate course in Soil Mechanics or an equivalent course.
CGS/CIVL 6211, 3 Credits

This course provides students a fundamental understanding of geosynthetic design for a geotechnical engineer. The course focuses on the manufacturing and industrial applications of a wide variety of geosynthetics, design calculations and considerations and evaluation of a geosynthetic design failure. There are no prerequisites for this course.
GS/CIVL 6212, 3 Credits

This course provides students a fundamental understanding of the basic principles of unsaturated soil mechanics presented as an extension of classical saturated soil mechanics. Students are expected to have completed soil mechanics/geotechnical engineering course at the undergraduate level.
GS/CIVL 6220, 3 Credits

This course presents the planning, analysis, and design of shallow and deep foundations at an advanced level. This course is designed to fully prepare a student to carry out sub-surface investigations, analysis and design of shallow and deep foundations.
GS/CIVL 6221, 3 Credits

Principles and applications of theoretical, numerical and physical modelling in geotechnical engineering. Topics include: Introduction to modelling; idealization of soil behaviour; constitutive modelling; numerical modelling; physical modelling; centrifuge modelling; theoretical modelling. Applications include: embankments; soft ground tunnelling; dams; retaining walls; foundations; soil reinforcement; soil-structure interaction.
GS/CIVL 6222, 3 Credits

This course is designed to develop a student’s understanding of how geohazards impact geotechnical engineers. The course is designed to first develop the student’s knowledge on the triggers, mechanisms and risks associated with geohazards such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, floods, tsunami’s before focusing on landslide susceptibility and risk.
GS/CIVL 6213, 3 Credits

This course is designed to develop a student’s understanding of how geohazards impact geotechnical engineers. The course is designed to first develop the student’s knowledge on the triggers, mechanisms and risks associated with geohazards such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, floods, tsunami’s before focusing on landslide susceptibility and risk.
GS/CIVL 6223, 3 Credits

Principles and applications of ground improvement techniques. Topics include: Densification, compaction, prefabricated drains (PVDs), vacuum preloading, electrokinetics, chemical stabilization, soil freezing, grouting, soil reinforcement using geosynthetics, anchors, nails and micropiles, stone columns, deep cement mixing (DCM) columns.
GS/CIVL 6200, 3 Credits

Emerging, current, or timely topics in Geotechincal Engineering that may be offered as a Directed Reading course.

Geoenvironmental Engineering

GS/CIVL 6310, 3 Credits

This course advances the student’s knowledge of undergraduate hydrogeology through theory and computer simulations. The course will focus on saturated flow in porous media, followed by mechanics of pumping of confined and unconfined aquifers. Contaminant hydrogeology will also be introduced. There are no prerequisites for this course.
CGS/CIVL 6320, 3 Credits

This course provides students a fundamental understanding of the flow and transport in the vadose zone. Theoretical as well as applied aspects of various processes and mechanisms of flow and transport are presented within the context of contaminant migration and remediation.
GS/CIVL 6321, 3 Credits

This course introduces students to contaminant hydrogeology through theory, field visits, and computer simulations and focuses on contaminant fate and transport, multiphase flow and fractured networks, and end with an investigation into new and emerging environmental pollutants. There are no prerequisites for this course.
GS/CIVL 6311, 3 Credits

This course outlines the design and operation of site remediation activities. It expands the students’ knowledge about subsurface contaminant fate and transport and delves into site remediation technologies. The course will include a site visit to an active remediation site and introduce students to new and emerging technologies. There are no prerequisites for this course.
GS/CIVL 6300, 3 Credits

Emerging, current, or timely topics in Geoenvironmental Engineering that may be offered as a Directed Reading course.

Structural Engineering

GS/CIVL 6410, 3 Credits

This course provides students with an understanding of advanced topics in reinforced concrete analysis and design. The content focuses on detailed sectional analysis, slender columns and strut and tie models, and the Modified Compression Field Theory for shear design. Students are expected to have completed reinforced concrete design at the undergraduate level.
CGS/CIVL 6411, 3 Credits

This course provides students with an introduction to modern seismology, ground-faulting and characteristics of earthquakes, derivation of the dynamic equations of motion of multi-degree of freedom systems, time-history analysis to ground excitations, damping, nonlinear hysteresis, nonlinear spectra, modal properties, analysis in the frequency domain, torsional response of structures, performance limit states and principles of base isolation.
GS/CIVL 6420, 3 Credits

This course provides students with an understanding of the mechanics and fundamental concepts of prestressed reinforced concrete. The content will include analysis and design principles according to Canadian design standards. The course will culminate with an applied design project of a prestressed concrete structure. Students are expected to have completed reinforced concrete design at the undergraduate level.
GS/CIVL 6421, 3 Credits

This course provides students with an introduction to seismic design of reinforced concrete structures. Topics range from a review of seismic hazard to the requirements of the National Building Code to state of the art in seismic design philosophy. Students are expected to have completed reinforced concrete design at the undergraduate level. Structural Dynamics & Earthquake Engineering (GS/CIVL 6411) is a prerequisite.
GS/CIVL 6413, 3 Credits

This course provides students with an understanding of advanced topics in the design of steel structures. Topics will include principles of local and global buckling and stability; plastic design of steel structures; plate girders; and composite members. Emphasis will be placed on overall structural analysis and design. Students are expected to have completed structural steel design at the undergraduate level.
GS/CIVL 6414, 3 Credits

This course provides students with tools in bridge engineering from an understanding of bridge loads, to simplified and advanced methods of analysis, to planning and selection of bridge systems, to design of reinforced concrete, structural steel, and prestressed reinforced bridges and their management, maintenance and monitoring, including corrosion repair. Students are expected to have completed reinforced concrete and structural steel design courses at the undergraduate level.
GS/CIVL 6422, 3 Credits

This course comprises cutting-edge, new concepts and technological developments in structural engineering. Topics include: computer-based modelling of structures; seismic assessment of existing structures; and, novel construction materials in structural engineering.
GS/CIVL 6400, 3 Credits

Emerging, current, or timely topics in Structural Engineering that may be offered as a Directed Reading course.
GS/CIVL 6490, 3 Credits

This course introduces notions of human behaviour in fires, including cognition perception, problem solving, decision-making and information processing. Techniques and ethics around gathering data on human behaviour in fire are presented. In addition to case studies, class discussion and design examples, students gain experience in the limitations, uncertainty and use of computational models and hand calculations associated with evacuation analysis.
GS/CIVL 6491, 3 Credits

This course is a basic course on the design and analysis of structures exposed to fire. It aims to enhance student understanding of the behaviour of materials and structural systems under fire load and introduce them to the principles and rational methodologies for Structural Fire Engineering Design in the context of Canadian building codes. Through class discussions, practical examples and case studies, students will obtain the background required to design buildings for fire resilience, gain experience with applications of resilience based design concepts taught in the course and discover current issues related to designing for fire safety.

Transportation Engineering

GS/CIVL 6510, 3 Credits

This course deals with fundamentals of transportation engineering, essential elements of geometric design of highways, traffic safety, and principles of transportation planning and traffic demand forecasting. There are no prerequisites for this course.
CGS/CIVL 6250, 3 Credits

This course provides students with an introduction to sustainable design of pavements for highways, airports and other industrial applications. Pavement materials and principles of analysis and design of pavements are covered in detail. There are no prerequisites for this course.
GS/CIVL 6511, 3 Credits

This course introduces the students to essential features of intelligent transportation systems (ITS) and provides them with the opportunity to explore and investigate the applications of ITS in delivering safe and efficient transportation systems and in preserving of transportation assets. There are no prerequisites for this course.
GS/CIVL 6521, 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide students with a strong theoretical and methodological foundation in road safety analysis. It focuses on the analysis of road collision data, the evaluation of safety countermeasures, the roadway safety management process, and the roadway design consistency. There are no prerequisites for this course.
GS/CIVL 6500, 3 Credits

Emerging, current, or timely topics in Transportation Engineering that may be offered as a Directed Reading course.

Water Resources Engineering

GS/CIVL 6600, 3 Credits

Emerging, current, or timely topics in Water Resources Engineering that may be offered as a Directed Reading course.
CGS/CIVL 6610, 3 Credits

This course introduces the scientific principles and practical engineering applications of numerical hydrodynamics. Through this course students will be able to solve the free surface flow equations using mostly finite difference techniques. The course also provides an overview of some of the fundamental mathematical equations governing open channel hydraulics. Throughout this course, students learn and develop advanced computational techniques to solve fundamental unsteady varied hydrodynamic flows, where no analytical solution is available.
GS/CIVL 6620, 3 Credits

This course will introduce and develop advanced engineering, mathematical and statistical techniques for modelling water resource systems and to quantify the uncertainty of these modelling techniques. The course includes 3 modules related to data-driven models (model development and performance testing), statistical methods (design of experiments, hypothesis testing, Bayesian analysis), and fuzzy set theory (fuzzy models, fuzzy arithmetic, fuzzification techniques).