Lassonde Civil Engineering

Close mobile menu

First Year

Fall

MATH 1013, 3 Credits

Introduction to the theory and applications of both differential and integral calculus. Limits. Derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Riemann sums, definite integrals and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Logarithms and exponentials, Extreme value problems, Related rates, Areas and Volumes. Prerequisite: SC/MATH 1515 3.00 or SC/MATH 1520 3.00, or a high school calculus course. Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1000 3.00, SC/MATH 1300 3.00, SC/MATH 1505 6.00, SC/MATH 1513 6.00, SC/MATH 1530 3.00, SC/MATH 1550 6.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1930 3.00, AP/ECON 1530 3.00. Prior to Fall 2009: Prerequisite: AS/SC/MATH 1515 3.00 or AS/SC/MATH 1520 3.00, or a high school calculus course. Course credit exclusions: AS/SC/MATH 1000 3.00, AK/AS/SC/MATH 1300 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 1505 6.00, AS/SC/MATH 1513 6.00, AS/MATH 1530 3.00, AK/AS/MATH 1550 6.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1930 3.00, AS/ECON 1530 3.00.
MATH 1025, 3 Credits

Topics include spherical and cylindrical coordinates in Euclidean 3-space, general matrix algebra, determinants, vector space concepts for Euclidean n-space (e.g. linear dependence and independence, basis, dimension, linear transformations etc.), an introduction to eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Prerequisites: One 12U or OAC mathematics course or equivalent. Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1021 3.00, SC/MATH 2021 3.00, SC/MATH 2221 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 26503.00. Prior to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/AS/SC/MATH 1021 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 2021 3.00, AK/AS/SC/MATH 2221 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 2650 3.00.
PHYS 1800, 3 Credits

Survey of the fundamental concepts of statics and dynamics with an emphasis on engineering applications. This is a calculus-based course intended primarily for engineering students. It includes tutorial and laboratory components. Three lecture hours per week; Two laboratory hours per week (for a total of Nine sessions); One tutorial hour per week. One term. Three credits. Prerequisites: 12U Physics or OAC Physics or SC/PHYS 1510 4.00. MHF4U Advanced Functions and MCV4U Calculus and Vectors, or 12U Advanced Functions and Introductory Calculus, or OAC Algebra and OAC Calculus. Corequisites: SC/MATH 1013 3.00 or SC/MATH 1300 3.00 or SC/MATH 1505 6.00. Course Credit Exclusions: SC/PHYS 1010 6.00, SC/PHYS 1410 6.00, SC/PHYS 1420 6.00.
ENG 1101, 4 Credits

Who is an engineer and what are his/her ethical and academic integrity obligations; communications strategies for technical subjects in oral and written forms; dealing with ambiguity, uncertainties, and open ended problems in a technical context, problem definition strategies. 4 hours per week lectures and 1 hour per week tutorial session.
EECS 1101, 3 Credits

The Objectives of 1011 are threefold:providing a first exposure to procedural programming, teaching students a set of soft computing skills (such as reasoning about algorithms, tracing programs, test-driven development), and demonstrating how computers are used in a variety of engineering disciplines. It uses problem-based pedagogy to expose the underlying concepts and an experiential laboratory to implement them. An integrated computingnenvironment (such as MATLAB) is used so that students can pick up key programming concepts(such as variables and control flow) without being exposed to complex or abstract constructs. The problems are chosen with consultation with the various engineering disciplines in the Faculty with a view of exposing how computing is used in these disciplines. Two hours per week for instructor’s lectures and three hours per week for lab work and tutorials. Prerequisites: None. Course credit exclusions: LE/EECS1541 3.00.

Winter

MATH 1014, 3 Credits

Calculus in Polar Coordinates. Techniques of Integration. Indeterminate Forms. Improper Integrals. Sequences, infinite series and power series. Approximations. Introduction to ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite(s): One of SC/MATH 1000 3.00, SC/MATH 1013 3.00, SC/MATH 1300 3.00, or SC/MATH 1513 6.00; for non-science students only, six credits from SC/MATH 1530 3.00 and SC/MATH 1540 3.00, SC/MATH 1550 6.00, AP/ECON 1530 3.00 and AP/ECON 1540 3.00. Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1010 3.00, SC/MATH 1310 3.00, SC/MATH 1505 6.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1940 3.00. Prior to Fall 2009: Prerequisite(s): One of AS/SC/MATH 1000 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 1013 3.00, AK/AS/SC/MATH 1300 3.00, or AS/SC/MATH 1513 6.00; for non-science students only, six credits from AS/MATH 1530 3.00 and AS/MATH 1540 3.00, AK/AS/MATH 1550 6.00, AS/ECON 1530 3.00 and AS/ECON 1540 3.00. Course credit exclusions: AS/SC/MATH 1010 3.00, AK/AS/SC/MATH 1310 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 1505 6.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1940 3.00.
CHEM 1100, 4 Credits

The course is designed for Engineering students interested in refreshing and expending their general chemistry knowledge while exploring the relationship between structure of matter, properties and processing. This course will focus mainly at covering important introductory concept to understand solution chemistry including reactivity, thermochemistry, structure and properties of materials. The course is divided in six sections. The first section covers an introduction to the topic of Materials Science and its impact on our daily lives as well as future trends and review key chemistry concepts required for this course. The second section will present the states of matter (gas, liquid and solid), their physical characteristics and the forces holding materials together (bonding and intermolecular forces). The third section will expend on the liquid phase and properties of solutions including equilibrium, solubility, pH and pKa. The fourth section will deal with thermochemistry and its first law with an emphasis on enthalpy as well as phase changes and phase diagrams. Section six will present an introduction to the properties of solids (electronic and mechanical) and criteria in the selection of materials will also be discussed. Section seven will present in more details structure-properties and processing of soft materials (natural and artificial polymer) in the context of the material covered in the other sections. Four lecture hours per week, one tutorial hour per week, and three hours of laboratory or active learning exercises every other week. One term. Four credits. Prerequisites: 12U chemistry or equivalent. Course credit exclusion: SC/CHEM 1000 3.00.
MATH 1013, 3 Credits

A survey of physics in which fundamental concepts in electricity, magnetism and optics are emphasized through engineering applications. This is a calculus-based course intended primarily for engineering students. It includes tutorial and laboratory components. Three lecture hours per week. Two laboratory hours per week (for a total of 9 sessions). One tutorial hour per week. One term. Three credits. Prerequisites: SC/PHYS 1800 3.00. Course Credit Exclusions: SC/PHYS 1010 6.00, SC/PHYS 1410 6.00, SC/PHYS 1420 6.00
ENG 1102, 4 Credits

This course will cover: engineering design methodology; features and elements of good design with environment and human interface considerations; aesthetics in design and idea communication using graphics and technical drawings. Lectures: 4 hours per week for 12 weeks. Tutorials: 1 hour per week for 12 weeks Pre-req.: LE ENG 1101 4.0.
EECS 1021, 3 Credits

The objective of 1021 is to introduce computational thinking – a process-based approach to problem solving. It uses a problem-based pedagogy to expose the underlying concepts and an experiential laboratory to implement them. The programming language is chosen so that it is widely used in a variety of applications, is object-oriented, and is of industrial strength (Java is an example of such a language). The problems are chosen in order to expose abstract programming concepts by immersing them in relevant and engaging applications. The experiential laboratory is based on sensors and actuators that connect to a computer. The problems are chosen with consultation with the various engineering disciplines in the Faculty with a view of exposing how computing is used in these disciplines. Tw hours per week lectures and three hours per week for lab work and tutorials. Prerequisites: LE/EECS1011 3.00. Course credit exclusions: LE/EECS 1022 3.00, LE/EECS1020 3.00, LE/CSE 1020 3.00, AK/AS/SC/CSE 1020 3.00.
ESSE 1012, 3 Credits

This course provides essential topics in Earth environment (Earth and oceanic science, atmospheric science, and geology) and explores the role played by global and local scale processes in shaping our planet. Concepts are described; the latest technology discussed, and links between engineering disciplines are provided. The course lectures are complemented by hands-on laboratory and field experience. Prerequisites: 12U calculus and vectors or 12U advanced functions and introductory calculus (pre 2007 version) or equivalent, or SC/MATH 1515 3.00; 12U physics or SC/PHYS 1510 4.00.

Second Year

Fall

MATH 2015, 3 Credits

Topics covered include partial derivatives; grad, div, curl and Laplacian operators; line and surface integrals; theorems of Gauss and Stokes; double and triple integrals in various coordinate systems; extrema and Taylor series for multivariate functions. Prerequisite: One of SC/MATH 1010 3.00, SC/MATH 1014 3.00, SC/MATH 1310 3.00; or SC/MATH 1505 6.00 plus permission of the course coordinator. Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 2010 3.00, SC/MATH 2310 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 2670 3.00, GL/MATH 3200 3.00. Prior to Fall 2009: Prerequisite: One of AS/SC/MATH 1010 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 1014 3.00, AK/AS/SC/MATH 1310 3.00; or AS/SC/MATH 1505 6.00 plus permission of the course coordinator. Course credit exclusions: AS/SC/MATH 2010 3.00, AK/AS/SC/MATH 2310 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 2670 3.00, GL/MATH 3200 3.00.
MATH 2930, 3 Credits

This is an applied probability and statistics course for engineering students. The aim is to provide an application oriented introduction to probability and statistics. The examples will be from a wide selection of engineering disciplines. The probability component is about 30% of the lectures. About 40% of the time, the lectures and tutorials focus on solving practical statistical problems that emerge from engineering problems. Three lecture hours per week. One mandatory tutorial per week. Prerequisites: SC/MATH 1014 3.00 or equivalent; SC/MATH 1025 3.00 or equivalent; LE/EECS 1011 3.00 or equivalent. Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1131 3.00; SC/MATH 2560 3.00; SC/MATH 2570 3.00; SC/MATH 2565 3.00.
CIVL 2120, 3 Credits

Chemical, physical and mechanical properties of common civil engineering materials, such as Portland cement, concrete, metals and alloys, wood, asphalt, masonry, and polymer composites; phenomenological basis for the properties of these materials; introduction to material characterization and quality control. Prerequisites: SC/CHEM 1100 4.00.
CIVL 2150, 3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to computer-aided drawing with applications in civil engineering and related disciplines. Students will learn about the principles of engineering drawings, create typical drawings using Computer-aided Drawing (CAD) tools, and read and interpret civil and geomatics engineering drawings. Prerequisites: LE/ENG 1102 4.00.
ENG 2001, 3 Credits

Introduction to the management, economics and safety as they relate to engineering projects, including the following. Project management: work breakdown structures, Gantt charts, logic diagrams and change management. Engineering economics: time value of money, comparison methods, rates of return. Workplace safety. Group design projects. Weekly tutorial. Prerequisites: LE/ENG 1101 4.00 or LE/ENG 1000 6.0.
CIVL 2160, 3 Credits

This course presents essential topics in physical geology and earth sciences, including: plate tectonics and the geological cycle; identification and physical properties of rocks, soil and minerals; igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rock formation; weathering and soil formation; structural geology and geological mapping; relative age relationships; and, near-surface geological processes and resulting landforms. The course also briefly introduces the students to the topics of earthquakes, landslides and other natural hazards and develops links to the physical properties. Prerequisite: ESSE 1012 3.00.

Winter

MATH 2271, 3 Credits

Introduction to ordinary and partial differential equations, including their classification, boundary conditions, and methods of solution. Equations, methods, and solutions relevant to science and engineering are emphasized, and exploration is encouraged with the aid of software. Three lecture hours per week. One term. Three credits. Prerequisites: One of SC/MATH 2010 3.00, SC/MATH 2015 3.00, SC/MATH 2310 3.00 or equivalent; one of SC/MATH 1025 3.00, SC/MATH 2022 3.00, SC/MATH 2222 3.00 or equivalent. Course Credit Exclusions: SC/MATH 2270 3.00, GL/MATH 3400 3.00 Prior to Fall 2009: Prerequisites: One of AS/SC/MATH 2010 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 2015 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 2310 3.00 or equivalent; one of AS/SC/MATH 1025 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 2022 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 2222 3.00 or equivalent. Course Credit Exclusions: AS/SC/MATH 2270 3.00, GL/MATH 3400 3.00.
CIVL 2210, 4 Credits

This course covers the basic properties of fluids and their measurement; fluid statics; kinematics of fluid flow; measurement of pressure; velocity and discharge; conservation of mass, momentum and energy; laminar and turbulent flow through pipes. Bernoulli's equation and its applications is also introduced. Prerequisites:  SC/PHYS 1800 3.00 and LE/CIVL2120
CIVL 2220, 4 Credits

This course builds on the concepts learned in first year engineering mechanics and emphasizes the understanding and application of three fundamental concepts in solid mechanics – equilibrium, constitutive relationships and compatibility. These concepts are introduced and reinforced using specific examples of axially-loaded members, pure bending, bending combined with shear, and torsion of circular shafts. The students are introduced to basic structural engineering design through simple examples of beam design for bending stresses and deformation. The course also introduces the students to the concept of two-dimensional transformation of stresses and strains using Mohr’s circle. Prerequisites: LE/CIVL 2210 3.0 and SC/PHYS 1800 3.00.
CIVL 2240, 3 Credits

Physical environment and how it is influenced by human activity; Mass and energy balance of environmental systems; environmental pollution and its causes; basic principles in chemistry and physics to explain the behaviour of pollutants in the environment (air, land and water); contaminant transport through air, water and solids; application of environmental engineering principles to water and wastewater treatment, water resources management, environmental impact assessment; environmental ethics; greenhouse effect; ozone depletion; acid precipitation; sustainable development and life cycle assessment; overview of environmental quality objectives, standards and guidelines. Prerequisites: LE/ESSE 1012 3.00 and SC/CHEM 1100 4.00.
ENG 2003, 3 Credits

Students learn to effectively employ communication strategies essential to a successful engineering career, including the social, rhetorical, ethical, and practical aspects of professional communications. The focus is on building individuals’ confidence and judgment through communications assignments based on case studies. Two lecture hours per week. Two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: LE/ENG 1101 4.0.
CIVL 2000, 3 Credits

Introduction to principles of engineering design via application to a suitable civil engineering project. Students work in groups of 3 or 4, with periodic monitoring of group interaction and performance. Deliverables include a formal design report and a formal oral presentation in front of peers and invited guests. Students' learning experience is enhanced through guest lectures from prominent member of civil engineering industry and academia. Prerequisites: LE ENG 2001 3.00, LE CIVL 2150 3.00 Co-requisites: LE/ENG 2003 3.00.

Summer

ESSE 2635, 3 Credits

This course provides fundamental concepts in land surveying where students obtain extensive hands-on experience in the use of land surveying instruments and in the essentials of survey practice in Civil Engineering domain. Coordinates systems, positioning concepts, measurements of distances, angles and leveling, survey calculations, Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) measurements, horizontal and vertical control survey networks, sources of error, and corrections and adjustments are introduced. Application exercises include use of geodetic instruments, point positioning, topographic mapping, route surveys, and construction surveying. Concepts of various geomatics positioning techniques such as photogrammetry, Remote Sensing (RS), Laser scanning (e.g. lidar) and global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) as well as the use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) systems are also covered. Prerequisite: ESSE1012 3.0; MATH 2930 3.0; CIVIL 2150 3.0 or permission of the instructor.

Third Year

Fall

CIVL 3110, 3 Credits

The course presents essential topics in engineering geology and soil mechanics, including geological cycle, the origin and nature of soils, soil identification and classification, site investigation techniques, compaction, seepage theory, groundwater flow nets, stresses and strains in soils, effective stress concept, consolidation, and shear strength of soils. Emphasis is on learning of fundamental soil mechanics concepts using examples of their application to geotechnical engineering. Laboratory practicum component of the course provides hands-on experience of laboratory tests that are commonly used for determination of physicochemical and engineering properties of soils. Prerequisites: LE/CIVL 2160 3.0; LE/CIVL 2210 3.00 or LE/CIVL 2210 4.00; LE/CIVL 2220 3.00 or LE/CIVL 2220 4.00.
LE/CIVL 3120, 4 Credits

This course focuses on fundamentals of hydrostatics and hydrodynamics; flow potential; dimensional analysis; boundary layer development; transient and steady-state flow conditions; flow of water through open and closed conduits, notches, orifices, and weirs; flow of water past objects. 

Prerequisites: LE/CIVL 2210 3.00 or LE/CIVL 2210 4.00.
CIVL 3130, 4 Credits

The course emphasizes the basic concepts of structural analysis and introduces and computer-aided analytical techniques. Internal forces in trusses and plane frames ; Bending moment, shear-force and axial-force diagrams in statically determinant structures due to applied loads; methods for estimating deflections; introduction of matrix structural analysis using the stiffness method and its application to 2-D trusses and frames; hand-calculation methods for statically indeterminate structures.

Prerequisites: LE/ CIVL 2220 3.00 or LE/CIVL 2220 4.00.
CIVL 3140, 3 Credits
ESSE 2210, 3 Credits

Winter

CIVL 3210, 3 Credits

The course focuses on practical applications of soil mechanics concepts to the analysis and design of foundations, excavations, earth-retaining systems and slopes. Topics include: analysis and design of shallow foundations in terms of bearing capacity and settlement; analysis and design and deep foundations including driven and bored piles; analysis and design of earth retaining systems; and, slope stability. Practicum component includes hands-on experience in extracting design parameters from results of site investigation and laboratory tests and preparing a geotechnical design report. Prerequisites: LE/CIVL 3110 3.0.
CIVL 3220, 3 Credits

The course introduces basic hydrological processes such as precipitation, evapotranspiration, runoff, infiltration, interception, and depression storage. It also covers engineering applications such as stream flow and storm hydrographs, flood routing, hydrological analyses and design, and watershed simulation. Prerequisites:  SC/MATH 2930 3.00; LE/CIVL 2210 4.00.
CIVL 3230, 3 Credits

This course provides a review of: basic structural systems, including gravity and lateral load-resisting systems; principles of Limit States Design according to the National Building Code (NBC) of Canada; and dead and live loads, snow and rain loads, and loads due to wind based on the NBC. Properties of structural steel and reinforced concrete will be discussed. Design of structural steel including tension members, compression members, beams, and connections will be based on CSA S16. Design of reinforced concrete according to CSA A23.3 will include: beams in flexural and shear; and columns under axial load, and combined axial load and bending. Prerequisites: LE/CIVL 2120 3.00; LE/CIVL 3130 3.00.
CIVL 3240, 3 Credits

Topics in this introductory sanitary and environmental engineering course include: environmental regulations; general wastewater quality parameters; the design of municipal water distribution and wastewater collection systems; basic water chemistry and water quality assessment; physical and chemical treatment processes involved in water and wastewater treatment; brief overview of urban storm water collection systems and the integration of unit processes and operations into a treatment system. Prerequisites: LE/CIVL 2240 3.00; LE/CIVL 3120 3.00 or LE/CIVL 3120 4.00.
CIVL 3260, 3 Credits

This course introduces students to the major theories, principles and methods used in the field of transportation planning and evaluation. Under transportation planning, the course considers how transportation planners and decision-makers have historically analyzed the way people and goods move around cities. This includes an examination of the four-step travel demand model (the most widely used model) giving emphasis to the analytical techniques used to forecast future daily traffic demand on a roadway network. Under transportation project evaluation, the course presents fundamental concepts for the economic evaluation of roadway infrastructure improvement projects. Emphasis is placed on user and non-user costs with additional applications of lifecycle cost analysis, benefit-cost analysis, and the integration of these tools to support effective decision making. Prerequisites: LE/ENG 2001 3.00, LE/CIVL 3160 3.00. Course Credit Exclusion: LE/CIVL 4032 3.00.
3 Credits

Fourth Year

Fall

CIVL 4000, 6 Credits

A small group of students will work as a team to undertake a Civil Engineering industry‐provided design project. The design solution will include the application of civil engineering knowledge and skills. The course builds on LE/CIVL 2000. Students apply at a professional level the knowledge and skills they have acquired from the Civil Engineering program and receive guidance and expert advice from guest speakers from civil engineering industry and academia on topics related to their design projects. Deliverables include progress reports, a comprehensive design report and a formal oral presentation to an audience comprising peers, instructors and industry professionals. The students are evaluated on their teamwork as well as on individual contributions. The evaluations include instructor evaluations as well as self and peer evaluations.

Prerequisites: ALL 2000 and 3000-level courses.
LE/CIVL 4110, 3 Credits

The course builds on the basic principles of project management covered in LE/ENG 2001. It covers salient features of the most widely accepted practices in the management of large civil engineering projects, grouped sequentially into five phases of initiation, planning, execution, monitoring/control, and closure. These five phases are presented using twelve areas of expertise needed by a professional project manager. The course uses a case-studies-based approach to cover various elements of project management, such as scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communication, risk and procurement, relevant to large civil engineering projects. Complexities of managing large projects are emphasized using example applications of advanced project control tools. International standards on project management are also introduced.

Prerequisites: LE/ENG 2001 3.00; LE/ENG 3000 3.00
LE/CIVL 4XXX, 3 Credits

One technical elective selected from the following five groups of technical electives:
Group A – Structural Engineering;
Group B – Geotechnical Engineering;
Group C – Hydrotechnical Engineering;
Group D – Transportation Engineering;
Group E – Environmental Engineering.
A maximum of three technical electives can be chosen from the same group.  Prerequisite(s): As per the selected course.
See the available Technical Electives here. 
LE/CIVL 4XXX, 3 Credits

One technical elective selected from the following five groups of technical electives:
Group A – Structural Engineering;
Group B – Geotechnical Engineering;
Group C – Hydrotechnical Engineering;
Group D – Transportation Engineering;
Group E – Environmental Engineering.
A maximum of three technical electives can be chosen from the same group.  Prerequisite(s): As per the selected course.
See the available Technical Electives here. 
3 Credits
3 Credits

Winter

CIVL 4000, 6 Credits

A small group of students will work as a team to undertake a Civil Engineering industry‐provided design project. The design solution will include the application of civil engineering knowledge and skills. The course builds on LE/CIVL 2000. Students apply at a professional level the knowledge and skills they have acquired from the Civil Engineering program and receive guidance and expert advice from guest speakers from civil engineering industry and academia on topics related to their design projects. Deliverables include progress reports, a comprehensive design report and a formal oral presentation to an audience comprising peers, instructors and industry professionals. The students are evaluated on their teamwork as well as on individual contributions. The evaluations include instructor evaluations as well as self and peer evaluations.

Prerequisites: ALL 2000 and 3000-level courses.
CIVL 4210, 3 Credits

Essential components of sustainable development framework; review of completed and on-going civil engineering projects using such a framework; discussions on environmental, socio-economic impacts and costs of these projects; sustainable development strategies in the light of infrastructure deficit, adaption of infrastructure to climate change, and water security; ways of building sustainable engineering capacity in the developing world.
Prerequisite(s): ENVS 2150 or ESSE 2210; LE/CIVL 4110 Civil Engineering Project Management.
LE/CIVL 4XXX, 3 Credits

One technical elective selected from the following five groups of technical electives:
Group A – Structural Engineering;
Group B – Geotechnical Engineering;
Group C – Hydrotechnical Engineering;
Group D – Transportation Engineering;
Group E – Environmental Engineering.
A maximum of three technical electives can be chosen from the same group.  Prerequisite(s): As per the selected course.
See the available Technical Electives here. 
LE/CIVL 4XXX, 3 Credits

One technical elective selected from the following five groups of technical electives:
Group A – Structural Engineering;
Group B – Geotechnical Engineering;
Group C – Hydrotechnical Engineering;
Group D – Transportation Engineering;
Group E – Environmental Engineering.
A maximum of three technical electives can be chosen from the same group.  Prerequisite(s): As per the selected course.
See the available Technical Electives here. 
3 Credits
3 Credits

Additional Opportunities

Technical Electives

A maximum of three technical electives can be chosen from any one Group.
Please note that not all technical electives may be offered each year.

Work Terms

A Co-op option is highly recommended for all engineering students, but it is not a degree requirement.

YEARFALLWINTERSUMMER
1Academic Term 1Academic Term 2
2Academic Term 3Academic Term 4Optional Work Term
3Academic Term 5Academic Term 6Optional Work Term
4Optional Work TermOptional Work TermOptional Work Term
5Academic Term 7Academic Term 8Graduate!